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Pumps & Pressure Tanks

If you live in the country, chances are you get your water from a well. You have a pump that either sucks the water into your home or one that pushes it in. If the pump is in the house, it's drawing it up from the well and you'll hear it when it's running. The water distribution system in your house will have a pressure tank connected to it and it's basically used to store a quantity of water that you'll use when flushing toilets or showering etc. As the name implies, the water is under pressure due to an air pocket that is in the pressure tank. The pump pushes the water against the air pocket and when the system reaches a preset pressure, the pump shuts off. When you turn on a tap the water is pushed out by the compressed air in the pressure tank. It's important to keep air in the tank to ensure that the pump gets to rest. If you lose the air in your pressure tank, every time you use the water, you'll be relying on the pump to do all the work. This is very hard on most pumps since they are coming on and shutting off much quicker and more often than neccessary.

Your pump will only come on so many times during it's life span, so when replacing a pressure tank, I usually recommend that the system has the biggest tank (within reason of course) that you can afford and for which you have the space. There are many many things to consider when installing or upgrading a pressure system, so be be sure to call a plumber (hopefully Hanwell Plumbing & Heating) and ask lots of questions to be sure you're getting what you pay for! Yes, it's like everything else, you get what you pay for. Not all pumps or presusre tanks are created equal so don't always look for the lowest price! Try to determine what's best for you: bladder vs. membrane; submersible vs. deep well jet....there's planty of options! So to learn more.....
"Just Call Robin! "
Hanwell Plumbing & Heating 705 749-4775
 

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